CDSB publications

Reporting framework

Framework for reporting environmental information & natural capital

The CDSB Framework sets out an approach to reporting environmental information & natural capital in mainstream reports, such as the annual report, 10-K filing or integrated report. View Framework.

Climate Change Reporting Framework Edition 1.1

The CDSB Climate Change Reporting Framework (CCRF) is a sub-set of the Framework for reporting environmental information & natural capital. It provides specific guidance on reporting climate change-related information of value to investors in mainstream financial reports to assess how climate change affects the strategy, financial performance and prospects of companies. View Framework.

Reporting guidance

Proposals for boundary setting in mainstream reports, discussion paper on organisational boundary setting by groups of companies or non-financial reporting purposes

This discussion paper explores the issue of organisational boundary setting for non-financial reporting purposes and offers suggested answers to some of the most often debated questions. View proposals.

   

EU environmental reporting handbook - What could environmental reporting in line with the Non-Financial Reporting Directive look like?

This handbook sets out a series of examples from annual reports of European companies to show how companies could respond to these upcoming requirements. These examples are for illustrative purposes only and are designed to help companies develop their reporting practice in line with the expectations of the NFR Directive.

   

Proposals for reporting on Carbon Asset Stranding Risks

Carbon Asset Stranding Risks (CASRs) are almost invisible in corporate reports. Notwithstanding the absence of relevant information, there are clear signals that investors are starting to recognise CASRs through various portfolio decarbonisation practices. View proposals. 

Considerations for reporting and disclosure in a carbon-constrained world

This paper is designed to assist the Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures members in assessing the ‘carbon bubble’ concept and ‘stranded asset’ risks inherent in the business-as-usual strategies of many fossil fuel companies. View paper.

Position paper on relevance & materiality, organisational boundaries and assurance

The purpose of this document is to explain the positions that CDSB has adopted in relation to three key themes in the CDSB Framework for Reporting Environmental Information and Natural Capital (the “CDSB Framework”). These are: relevance and materiality; organisational boundary setting; and assurance. View position paper. 

The case for consistency in corporate climate-change related reporting

This paper compares climate change reporting schemes, identifies common characteristics and examines challenges to consistency. View paper.

Climate resilient stock markets – climate change reporting proposals for adoption or support by stock exchanges

This report proposes corporate climate change reporting requirements for adoption or support by stock exchanges. It is designed to encourage the supply and use of information to strengthen the resilience of markets against climate change disruption. View report.

Climate change – your journey to integrated reporting

Integrated and climate change-related reporting practices can both help to shape a corporation’s competitive advantage, and recognising the synergies between these practices can minimise reporting burdens on already strained corporate compliance functions. This publication therefore aims to increase awareness, deepen understanding and empower stakeholders to address the challenges posed by these new reporting practices. View publication. 

Frequently Asked Questions on Corporate Sustainability Reporting

This document tackles the big questions around the global corporate sustainability reporting agenda by setting out the background to sustainability reporting and introducing readers to what it is, who is involved in developing it and why it is important. It provides an overview of current sustainability reporting policies and practices and focuses on the opportunities to develop corporate sustainability reporting further. View document. 

Communicating climate change in mainstream reports

This document provides guidance on using the CDSB Climate Change Reporting Framework to enhance the quality of climate change disclosures in mainstream reporting – in turn making life easier for producers of reports – and increase the relevance of environmental information disclosure for the investment community. View document. 

Reporting provisions 

Making the connections – showing alignment in non-financial reporting approaches

Driving consistency sits at the core of everything we do. To help you navigate the different codes, frameworks and standards that inform corporate non-financial reporting practice, we have prepared a table showing how some of the most widely used reporting approaches align with each other and with CDSB’s reporting principles and  requirements on environmental information and natural capital. View table. 

Comply or explain: A review of FTSE 350 companies’ environmental reporting and greenhouse gas emission disclosures in annual reports

CDSB has comprehensively reviewed the annual reports of the FTSE 350 listed companies in the report. This review discusses the disclosure of environmental information in the annual reports of FTSE350 companies following the implementation of mandatory greenhouse gas reporting in the UK (updates to the Companies Act 2006).

Comply or explain focuses on comparative sector analysis and uses illustrative examples to provide evidence of current practice following the policy revision. The report proposes steps that could be taken by regulators to enhance the enabling environment for disclosure. It was reviewed by Oxford University’s Saïd Business School. View report.

Mapping the sustainability reporting landscape: lost in the right direction

ACCA’s and CDSB’s new report examines the changing corporate sustainability reporting landscape, outlines its components, addresses current challenges and proposes development opportunities. It provides a considered overview of the trends, levers and drivers influencing the reporting landscape.

Climate change disclosure in G20 countries: Stocktaking of corporate reporting schemes

This OECD-CDSB report analyses mandatory reporting schemes in G20 countries and identifies commonalities and divergences between them. View report.

Corporate Disclosure of Climate Change-Related Information - Convergence, Differences and Impact

This paper is a summary of a report by the OECD and CDSB analysing government schemes in G20 countries promoting corporate disclosure of climate-change related information. The report explores convergence and differences among these schemes, the extent and depth of information requested, the use of information by companies, investors and other stakeholders, and a preliminary assessment of the use and impacts of these schemes in changing business conduct and ultimately in contributing to governments’ climate change objectives. View paper. 

Corporate climate change reporting: Japan Focus

This briefing paper focuses on Japan’s corporate climate change reporting landscape and highlights important findings reflecting the need to integrate rigorous climate change-related disclosures in mainstream financial reports. View briefing paper.

Korea Focus: Corporate climate change reporting for a sustainable future

This briefing paper presents a summary of the corporate climate change reporting landscape in South Korea specifically and highlights important findings reflecting the need to integrate rigorous climate change-related disclosures in mainstream financial reports to secure a more sustainable future. View briefing paper.

Financial Institutions: Taking Greenhouse Gases into Account – a report by CDSB for the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (UK)

This paper makes a rigorous investigation of the ways that financial institutions in the US, Europe, Japan and Australia have applied regulatory requirements to take environmental considerations, and particularly industrial emissions of greenhouse gases, into account. Empirical evidence is provided and used to build a theory of environmental investing linking investors’ behavioural motivations, behavioural intentions and actual decisions. View paper.